Frequently Asked Questions

COVID-19

Information related to COVID-19 affecting Logan County IL.

Logan County Current Statistics

Logan County Department of Public Health

Memorial Health System  - Includes daily statistics for MHS and a COVID-19 Risk Screening

State of Illinois Coronavirus Website

Business Resources related to COVID-19  If you have questions about an event, procedures for your business, or questions relating to any of the Governor's Executive Orders, please contact the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity

If you think you have been exposed to COVID‑19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.

COVID-19 Information

Fire Department

Frequently asked questions submitted by the Lincoln Fire Department.

DON'T GET BURNED

Did you know that cooking fires are the most common causes of home fires and home fire injuries? Pans left unattended while hot on the stove are obvious culprits but there are a number of less obvious causes that may be news to you. In Lincoln  kitchen fires are on the rise. Here are 10 tips to prevent kitchen fires and keep your family safe.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, cooking fires are not only the leading cause of home structure fires, the majority of kitchen fire injuries occur when victims try to fight the fire themselves. Wouldn't it be smarter to avoid cooking fires altogether? You can, with the following kitchen safety tips from Lincoln Fire Department.

kitchen fire 10 TIPS TO PREVENT KITCHEN FIRES

1. STAY IN THE KITCHEN

"The most common fires occur from people leaving food on the stove unattended. Don't leave the kitchen while you have things cooking, If you have to leave the kitchen, turn off the stove and take your pots and pans off the heat. This is equally important if you are broiling food in the oven - take the food out of the oven and turn off the broiler. 

2. WATCH YOUR CLOTHING

Long, flowing sleeves, large-fitting shirts and even aprons can catch fire. Inspectors recommends that, when cooking, wear short or close-fitted sleeves and keep your baggy shirts tucked in or tied back with a well-fitted apron.

3. BE AWARE OF THE ITEMS AROUND THE STOVETOP

Kitchen towels, oven mitts, appliance cords and even curtains can easily catch fire if set near a hot burner. Always move flammable items away from your stovetop. "And be careful when using towels to move a pot off the burner. Ideally, use an oven mitt, but if using a towel, be sure it doesn't dangle down and touch the burner.

 4. KEEP A FIRE EXTINGUISHER IN OR NEAR THE KITCHEN

In the case you do have a fire, a fire extinguisher can make the difference between an easy to clean up burned pan and a kitchen engulfed in flames. Be sure you actually know how to use it, too.

5. CHANGE THE BATTERIES IN YOUR SMOKE DETECTOR

Chances are you have a smoke detector in the kitchen or in the room adjacent to the kitchen. Inspectors says its not enough to have a smoke detector – you need to make sure the smoke detector is operable. LFD recommends changing your smoke detector batteries every six months, or when you change your clocks.

 6. NEVER THROW HOT GREASE IN THE GARBAGE CAN

"First of all, know the smoke points of your oils and never subject an oil with a low smoke point to high heat cooking – it can catch fire," says NFPA. "Second, never throw hot grease in the garbage can. Even if the grease isn't on fire, it can cause something in the garbage to burn." Instead, let grease cool and dispose of it in an old coffee can.

Note: A smoke point is the temperature at which an oil starts to break down. In addition to being a potential fire hazard, it can be damaging to your health. Fats that have gone past their smoke points are believed to contain large amounts of free radicals, which contribute to cancer. 

7. EXTINGUISH CANDLES

Keep your candlelit dinners romantic by keeping the heat only between you and your mate. Candles are another common cause of house fires. In addition to using wider, shorter candles, which are less likely to tip over, be sure to extinguish candle flames as soon as you are done in the kitchen.

 8. BE PREPARED TO PUT OUT A FIRE

Though you don't want a fire to occur, be prepared in the case it does. The best thing to do if you have a stovetop fire is to put a proper fitting lid over the pan or pot to smother it. Never use water and never pick a burning pan up and put it in the sink – you not only risk spreading the fire to the sink, you risk getting badly burned if the burning ingredients slosh out "Don't use flour to put out a fire – it can burn, too – and it makes a mess."

9. HAVE A FIRE ESCAPE PLAN

Keep the fire department telephone number written and/or programmed on your telephone. Sit down with your family and have a fire escape plan that includes getting out of the house and meeting outside in a designated area. It's important that your family – especially your kids – know what to do before a fire occurs. Practice your plan every month.

10. STOP, DROP, ROLL

In the event you do catch fire, follow the Stop, Drop, Roll Principal. Don't run if your clothing catches fire – stop where you are, drop to the ground, and roll.

 

Don't ever hesitate to call Lincoln Fire Department – even if you have successfully put out your fire. It's better to be safe than sorry. Practice fire prevention measures every time you are in the kitchen, and be sure to pass the measures on to your kids.

Will everyone in your household do the right thing during the violent shaking of a major earthquake? Before it is too late, get together with your family or housemates to plan now what each person will do before, during and after.

Once the earthquake or disaster is over, we will have to live with the risk of fire, the potential lack of utilities and basic services, and the certainty of aftershocks. By planning now, you will be ready. This plan will also be useful for other emergencies.

The safety and well-being of your loved ones are important, so take time NOW to develop a family earthquake preparedness plan. If you’ve already developed a plan, take time now to review and update it. Below is a sample plan that you can use for your family.

PLAN TO BE SAFE DURING AN EARTHQUAKE

  • Practice "drop, cover, and hold on” to be safe during an earthquake. 

drop cover hold

  • Identify safe spots in every room, such as under sturdy desks and tables.
  • Learn how to protect yourself no matter where you are when a disaster strikes.


PLAN TO RESPOND AFTER AN EARTHQUAKE

  • Keep shoes and a working flashlight next to each bed.
  • Teach everyone in your household to use emergency whistles and/or to knock 3 times repeatedly if trapped. Rescuers searching collapsed buildings will be listening for sounds.
  • Identify the needs of household members and neighbors with special requirements or situations, such as use of a wheelchair, walking aids, special diets, or medication.
  • Take a Red Cross first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training course. Learn who in your neighborhood is trained in first aid and CPR.
  • Know the location of utility shutoffs and keep needed tools nearby. Know how to turn off the gas, water, and electricity to your home. Only turn off the gas if you smell or hear leaking gas.
  • Get training from your local fire department in how to properly use a fire extinguisher.
  • Install smoke alarms and test them monthly. Change the battery once a year, or when the alarm emits a "chirping" sound (low-battery signal).
  • Check with your city or county to see if there is a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program in your area. If not, ask how to start one.

PLAN TO COMMUNICATE AND RECOVER AFTER A DISASTER

  • Locate a safe place outside of your home to meet your family or housemates after the disaster.
  • Designate an out-of-state contact person who can be called by everyone in the household to relay information.
  • Provide all family members with a paper list of important contact phone numbers.
  • Determine where you might live if your home cannot be occupied after an earthquake or other disaster (ask friends or relatives).
  • Know about the emergency plan developed by your children’s school or day care. Keep your children's school emergency release card current.
  • Keep copies of essential documents, such as identification, insurance policies and financial records, in a secure, waterproof container, along with your disaster supplies kits. Include a household inventory (a list and photos or video of your belongings).
  • Have occasional "earthquake drills” to practice your plan. Ask your babysitters, house sitters, neighbors, coworkers, and others about their disaster plans, and share your plan and with them.

Below is NIE Fire Safety Week flyer discussing 9-1-1.

adobe pdf icon NIE Fire Safety Week 4 (PDF)

turkey-fire-explosion-aftermathWith the Thanksgiving holiday rapidly approaching, the increased use of turkey fryers also increases the potential for accidental fires and/or burns related to this use.  As the attached document indicates, Underwriters Laboratories (UL) refuses to approve any of the currently availble turkey fryers due to the myriad of potential dangers these devices pose.  The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) also offer guidance regarding the use of turkey fryers.  Both documents also include common safety precautions for residents who decide to deep fry their turkey.  The documents can be cited by any department looking to issue warnings and/or guidance for the use of turkey fryers to the general public.


The link below will take you to the UL website where a video about turkey fryers can be viewed.

http://www.safetyathome.com/seasonal-safety/holiday-safety-articles/turkey-fryers-not-certified-by-ul/

Below is a flyer for the NIE Fire Safety Week.  There is great information on Fire Safety and protecting your home.

 

adobe pdf icon NIE Fire Safety Wk 2 (PDF)

 

Fire Chief Miller

CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19)

Information is available on the following sites:
Logan County Current Statistics

Memorial Health System  - Includes daily statistics for MHS and a COVID-19 Risk Screening

Local Business Resources
Logan County Department of Public Health
Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH)
Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

 

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Contact Information

 

cityhall smallCity of Lincoln

City Hall
700 Broadway Street
Lincoln, Illinois 62656

(217)735-2815

 

Legal Disclaimer

Mayor
(217)735-1612
 
Administrative Assistant
(217)732-2122
 
City Clerk
(217)735-2815
 
Building and Safety
(217)732-6318
 
Street and Alley
(217)732-4655
 
Waste Water Treatment
(217)732-4030
 
Fire Department
(217)735-4020
 
Police Department
(217)732-2151